3 Questions to Ask Before Starting Church Funding Initiatives

Things to consider as you write your business plan and vision statement.

As you start to write your business plan and vision statement to clearly present the vision that God has placed in your heart for your church, consider the following three key questions:

1. Are the Projects Clearly Defined?

The who, what, why, when, where, and how much are questions that need to be completely fleshed out in the business plan and vision statement before you go public to discuss funding the project.

If you are going to a bank to borrow money for a project, your banker will ask you the same questions for clarity before approving a loan. In the same way, you must clearly define the scope of your project for funding, so the congregation is clear on what you propose everyone do together.

2. Have You Defined the Project Expense Budget?

In a funding initiative you are raising funds for one or several projects, and there is a specific amount that is needed.

The more you can itemize the expenses and how the money will be used, the more convincing you will be with your congregants when you invite them to participate financially. Clear communication about the business plan is one of several funding initiative components that will help create quality buy-in and understanding.

3. What Are the Project Components?

Normally a project, such as a new addition, will have several components. It is important that you define those components and factor in each component’s estimated cost into the project budget. For example, if your vision is to have a youth center built, then you would need to lay out its component, perhaps in the following way:

From Outreach Magazine  Neighborly Faith Conference (Nov. 1–2)

Youth Center
• Functional multi-purpose space
• Welcoming lobby
• Public amenities, i.e., restrooms, etc.
• Gathering space for services to seat 150
• Small kitchen
• Gymnasium
• Offices
• Game room
• Parking lot

Total estimated cost for 10,000 square feet at $150 per square foot = $1.5 million estimated project cost

Excerpted from Funded: A Leader’s Guide to Raising Money God’s Way by Roger Lane. Used by permission.